Feature Story from NYTimes: In Online Games, a Path to Young Consumers

I personally enjoy writing and reading longer more in depth feature stories rather than hard spot news stories. Both are equally important in that hard breaking news stories get vital and relevant information to the reader fast and efficiently and feature news stories sort of remind us of an issue that may not have been talked about recently, with a more in depth and meticulous angle.

From class, we learned features should always stick to the reporting and peg certain issues that will capture people’s attention. In other words, an issue that is relevant and important and will resonate with people. There is also a lot of research that goes into these types of stories, you need to find out what others have already found out about this issue so you can move beyond that. You must also present opposing points to avoid being biased and give different sides a fair chance. The final thing to keep in mind when writing feature stories is to draw a conclusion, check and recheck sources to confirm your point and then sum it up for the reader.

I found this story in the NYTimes Health section:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/21/business/21marketing.html?_r=1&ref=health

The beginning sets the scene describing a young girl aged 10 playing an online computer game. The author doesn’t assume her feelings, they simply set the scene in an appropriately descriptive manner. They hook the reader with the line, “But this is not just a game, it is also advertising.” This will grab any parents’ attention whose kids go online.

The writer talks about the concerns of nutrition experts in the prominence of “junk food” advertising on websites that feature kids’ games. Bringing nutrition experts into the story creates a reliable and valid source, if they’re concerned, you should be too.

This story is relevant with the growth of new media and social networking. kids are online more now than ever before and advertisers are taking advantage of that. This article begs the question: where is the line between advertisements and invasion of privacy?

I have personal experience with this as I surf the web or go on sites like Facebook I see how eerily the advertisements mirror exactly what my interests are.

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About nancypierce

Hello All. My name is Nancy Pierce I am a Sophomore Journalism major with an interest in women's mental and physical health. I am also interested in environmental issues as well. I loooovveee running it is my biggest stress reliever and i also play lacrosse.
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